Painter Hu Ming

December 15, 2008

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check out the oil painting of hu ming.

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diff art

October 21, 2008

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For the Love of Art

PAPER has a habit of preferring artists to the usual roster of Pop culture celebrities, for the most part, and regularly turns to them in times of doubt. While the dust was still settling in the wake of 9/11, on the first day we were able to get back into our downtown offices, the publishers decided to scrap an entire issue to ask the many artists who lived in close proximity to the World Trade Center to visually respond to a world suddenly turned upside down — because we have always trusted artists to be the last sacred alchemists in our culture, able to make meaning through the most elemental act of questioning. For all our love of art, though, PAPER has never in its 25-year history done an “art issue.” We do it now because on some intuitive level we knew that at this pivotal time for the nation and the planet, on the eve of an election with such crucial consequences, we need art more than ever. As we live in a time of pluralism, when diversity reigns over the authority of any single orthodoxy, we didn’t want to presume to be definitive.

Here our favorite artists and players in the art world tell us who and what they care about now and why, and by doing so, give us much to think about in the wider community of ideas and sensibilities that ultimately bind us together. Terence Koh and Cecily Brown talk about sex and sexuality in art; the inimitable Tauba Auerbach writes a passage of scientific genius; Shepard Fairey visits the increasingly provocative and populated terrain of political art; and more — RoseLee Goldberg on Performance Art, Anne Pasternak on public art, Mark Tribe considers the world of digital art and representation, James Fuentes interviews Rob Pruitt on humor, Michael Nevin explores his love of drawing, Shirin Neshat addresses feelings of exile, and Marc Schiller talks art and commerce by revisiting his earlier thoughts on “The Banksy Effect.”

++ CLICK ON THE IMAGE TO READ THE STORY ++

This story was published on October 10, 2008.

vietnam art

November 24, 2007

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

signs with no signs

November 24, 2007

 

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The Lottery

June 30, 2007

The Lottery

IMAGE DESCRIPTIONThe Draft Board

I went to one of the most unique and bad-ass hoop party/event/gallery opening last night. Check out the premise:

Our boy Chris Isenberg from No Mas (dope clothing line) did crazy digital renderings of headshots of every NBA lottery pick from 1985 to 1995. The headshots were all from the year they were drafted and mounted on canvas for last night’s “lottery.” Sponsored by Puma (No Mas has an exclusive shoe coming out with Puma later this year), the
gallery was set up to look like the NBA Draft. Everyone at the party got a scratch
card – some 500 were distributed – in hopes of being one of the of the 105 picks available (some people, like me, got two cards). They then had a David Stern-looking dude (seriously) and a ping-pong ball machine (again, I’m serious) and they had a draft lottery. I got the 18th pick with one card and the 76th pick with my other card. With my two picks I got to draft two of the players and actually take home the art pieces. We’ll hook you up with the whole draft later today, but from memory, I believe Patrick Ewing went 1st overall, Len Bias (RIP) went 2nd, Shaq 3rd, KG 4th, Chris Mullin 5th, Luc Longley 6th, and Penny Hardaway 7th.

Why did Longley go so high? His picture was amazing, flowing mullet and all.

With the 18th pick I was deciding between the X-Man or Glenn Rice, who’s art piece was one
of the cooler ones available. After consulting with Chris (who suggested I either go Rice or go nuts and draft Tim Perry), I brought home Rice. With the 76th pick and a lot of good players on the board, I fought the urge to draft The Rifleman, Chuck Person, and instead hooked up Pat (our Editorial Director) with Bobby Hurley, who I know he has a strange white-boy obession with. Josh with a mid 40’s pick took home Mitch “Rock” Richmond. Our other boy had a pick in the 60’s and took Big Dogg Glenn Robinson, for the sole reason that he has a friend in Milwaukee who hates Dogg and he figured this would be good torture material. He also had to work out a trade for Big Dogg with some other guy. The trade somehow involved Armon Gilliam.

Besides the amazing fact that we actually got to take home the art pieces, it was also a party, with a DJ, and open bar.

Big thanks to Chris, No Mas, and Puma for the great night